An Intern’s Day At Shuttle Delivery By SFS Student Geo Sanghyuk Yoo

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A collective which strives for revenue, not people: that is the most common perception one has towards a corporation or a business. I too, as a mere student that hasn’t experienced much of this vast industry, had the same shades on when viewing companies. However, that stereotypical lens was shattered into pieces when I experienced the business environment within a small start-up company named Shuttle Delivery. To be quite frank, nothing that occured was anything close to what I expected–a complete shock in terms of my 15 year lifetime. Even though I had many experiences with collaborative work within school, the cooperative environment I encountered at a workplace like Shuttle was completely different. It felt as if every contributor of the company was upheld with utmost respect and was given fair credit for everything they accomplished. Instead of focusing on how to gain the most profit, the whole company strives towards building relationships, both internally and externally. I could see that everybody was extremely passionate about their job, each doing their part to accomplish a greater goal.

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One sector that really spoke to me was the customer service team in the company. Overflowing with calls every single second, I could see the intensity within the room as everyone rushed to keep things organized. What really surprised me is that even though they were in such an overwhelming and intense situation, they always kept their composure and kindness. The way they treat their customers with individualized care was fascinating, and I could proudly say that I would be very happy with the service even if I was a customer myself.

 

Just to provide a bit of insight as in what the internal atmosphere of this company actually feels like, I’ve interviewed the head of the customer service department.

 

Question #1: How long have you worked in Shuttle and how was your experience so far?

 

I have been in Shuttle for 2 years now. The work is sometimes stressful when issues pop out, but it’s usually very manageable.

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Question #2: What do you think is different about the Shuttle community compared to other companies?

 

I have to say that the working environment here is much more free than other places. Also, it’s really nice as I can say my opinions freely towards the development of the company.

 

Question #3: What is the most interesting experience you’ve had whilst being part of the team?

 

I would say that the most interesting experience I had was just spending time with everyone while having dinner after work. After a stressful day, having good food with good people will always be remembered.

 

In my opinion, Shuttle is like a David in the bible–a small powerhouse which has the potential to compete against colossal opponents. With gigantic companies such as FoodFly or 배달의 민족 monopolizing the market, it’s hard for small start-up businesses like Shuttle to survive in this industry. However, after experiencing the exceptional internal atmosphere of the company, I could see how maybe, just maybe, this small business can be a gamechanger. Encompassing family-like characteristics that none of the gigantic corporations can ever imagine, the Shuttle team’s sense of unification and cooperation is amazing, and that directly shows towards the end consumer as well.

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An Intern’s Day At Shuttle Delivery By SFS Student Elias Kim

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As the school year comes to a close we see school’s start offering new opportunities to their students. One of these opportunities is for two Seoul Foreign School students to spend a week here at shuttle. During our time here we will be taking a look at the different parts of the business, from the customer service, to the sales, and marketing teams.

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Yesterday, we got a chance to call some of Shuttle’s partner restaurants and ask them a few questions. Not many of them spoke fluent english so it was more difficult for me as I can’t speak Korean. Nevertheless I managed to get a few answers out of the polite restaurant employees. Most of the questions I asked were either about the restaurants, or later on their relationship with shuttle. I wanted to know more about this as a highschool student going into their junior year without much of an idea of what they want to go into in the future I wanted to know most about what being a business entails and what helps to make a business successful. I wouldn’t consider myself the most qualified person to talk about this as someone who has next to no experience with the business world but being able to glean the information I could was really beneficial for me. It helped me think about what kind of person I want to be in the future and, if I was to go into business, what kind of business I would want to run.

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The first set of calls I made was to restaurants in the Yeonhui-dong area. Most of the restaurants either didn’t pick up, had managers who were absent, or couldn’t speak english so I could only awkwardly thank them for their time and move on. As a Korean person growing up in Korea without speaking Korean I had faced these kinds of problems before, but it was painfully visible when I didn’t know how to ask if the restaurants had an english speaker that I was struggling. I was however able get a few answers from Delhi India at the start, and this helped me stay motivated for the rest of the time I called in the Yeonhui-dong area. The first thing I had wanted to know was about the people and the restaurant themselves. It was interesting to learn more about the people running the restaurants rather than just focusing on the food. Aside from those I started to want to learn more about shuttle itself and how it had affected the businesses of those it partnered with. There was a wide difference. For Delhi India shuttle seemed to have helped them gain more customers and exposure. While for Beth’s Poutine, a restaurant in the second round of calls to Itaewon, didn’t seem to have noticed any real difference in their sales from before and after they partnered with shuttle. Another interesting difference I noticed was that with larger chain companies like Halal Guys the answers given were much shorter and were relatively vague in comparison to the smaller diner like restaurants. The answers the managers were able to give were also very different. At Delhi India the manager was able to answer all the questions regarding major decisions in the restaurant like the location and genre of food. At Halal Guys the manager position was just another rung on the ladder. The person in the position had been promoted to it 4 months prior. It was interesting to see the differences between the two extremes and it helped me have a clearer view on what’s more important in a job that I would want in the future. A steady stable income with the reassurance of a franchise behind your back. Or the relative freedom that comes with starting and managing your own restaurant.